Make a cushion cover

Cushions are an easy way to update a room by adding colour, texture and reflecting the changing seasons or celebrations throughout the year. 

They are simple to make and a luxurious and professional finish can be obtained for a fraction of the cost of a retail equivalent.

We have a nearby shop that sells the scraps from a high end furniture upholstery workshop. The fabric for the cushions I made here cost £4. It’s always worth having a root around in a remnants box.

MATERIALS & EQUIPMENT

Fabric (medium weight)

Fabric scissors

Pins

Pattern paper

Ruler with set square 

Pencil

Matching strong cotton thread

50cm invisible zip

Sewing machine

Overlocker (or alternative seam finishing materials)

METHOD

I’ve run out of pattern paper so I used some baking paper to draw the pattern. This makes a 50x50cm cushion cover. Each piece, as shown below, has a 1cm seam allowance. 

(Adjust measurements to your requirements – always remember to add 1cm seam allowance).

   

Use a set square to get the right angles straight. Double check all the measurements, cut the templates and pin in place on fabric. 

If you are using fabric with a pattern, remember to pin template according to pattern. If using velvet, be sure that the grain flows in the same direction for all the pieces.

I made two cushions so folded fabric to cut x2 pieces at the same time.

 

 
Cut fabric and overlock the edges. If you don’t have an overlocker, fabric glue will seal edges or iron on webbing, binding or zig zag stitch.
 
Machine stitch the open zip in place with an invisible zip foot. 

It should like this from the back (picture above)

And like this from the front (pic below)  

Change machine invisible zip foot to a zip foot (looks like a regular machine foot that’s been cut in half).

Next, with the zip open, sew 8cm in from the sides of cover to close the openings on both ends of the zip (sew as close to the zip as possible – you’ll be able to feel the zip through the fabric). 

The gap shown in the above picture should now be sewn together so there should be a neat finish when opening and closing the zip.

Pin front and back pieces together with the wrong side showing (making sure grain and pattern is matched) **Leave zip open halfway -so cushion can be turned the right way after stitching edges.

Sew all edges leaving 1cm seam. 

Turn the cover the right way through the open zip and gently push the corners out with a blunt intrument such as a knitting needle.

Insert a duck feather cushion pad. 

I’ve used a 56cm cushion pad but one up to 60-70cm can be used for extra plumpness.

   

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